Rowing is primarily a cardio workout, but it’s also more than that. Your heart rate is absolutely going to be climbing, but unlike a jog in the park, you might also be sore the next day. The rower requires you use your legs more than anything, and as we know, your quads, glutes, calves, and hamstrings are the biggest, most powerful muscles in your body. But you’re also pulling with your arms, shoulders, abs and engaging your back. That said, you’re not pulling as hard as you might with, say, a seated cable row machine at the gym. You don’t want to hurt your back, but you can engage them and this will help you get those muscles toned.
The WaterRower US office got in on the Pull for a Cure fundraising action and all pulled together to raise money for breast cancer! - - - - As many of you may already know, throughout the month of October, WaterRower has been raising money through our Pull for a Cure fundraiser. For each 500m workout rowed and posted online, we'll be donating $1 towards breast cancer research! Don't forget to get your workouts in before Monday, October 31st! #PullForaCure #WaterRower
There are 4 main rowing machine types that are classed according to its utilized resistance mechanism. Having an exercise workout needs to have resistance against the movement in order to provide to the muscles and the cardiovascular system a good change. This can be provided by the rowing machine whenever you pull its handle and then slide back to the seat. Having low resistance works on the cardiovascular system can make you row fast easily. Having high resistance means that it provides you with the anaerobic session, working with the muscles harder, also having a slow stroke rate because of the harder pull.
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Row, Jimmy, row…🎶 What’s one of the best things about using the WaterRower? There’s no such thing as an age limit when it comes to using it because of its ability to provide a workout with minimal impact on the joints. You don’t have to take our word for it, but we think you might want to take this fellas. Jimmy is 93 years young and hopped on the WaterRower for the first time yesterday. Let’s hear it for Jimmy!
This popular rowing machine utilizes magnetic resistance for a quiet, and very smooth workout. The Velocity Exercise CHR-2001 also features a programmable computer with 12 programs that will keep your exercising varied and challenging for years. The computer also provides data on distance, time, calories burned, pulse rate, strokes per minute, and stroke count. Additionally, the tension resistance is electronically controlled via the computer.  This electronic resistance control feature puts the CHR-2001 ahead of other magnetic rowers that tend to use knobs.
From a fitness perspective, the WaterRower Classic works 84 percent of your muscle mass, helping tone and strengthen your muscles while burning far more calories than most other aerobic machines. The exercise is also low impact, as it removes all the body weight from the ankles, knees, and hips, but still moves the limbs and joints through a full range of motion--from completely extended to completely contracted.
From a fitness perspective, the WaterRower Natural works 84 percent of your muscle mass, helping tone and strengthen your muscles while burning far more calories than most other aerobic machines. The exercise is also low impact, as it removes all the body weight from the ankles, knees, and hips, but still moves the limbs and joints through a full range of motion--from completely extended to completely contracted.
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